[–] maxxxxx link

That's a problem with a lot of interviews. Journalists almost always go for the "human" side but I enjoy reading about the technical evolution and how things developed.

I just read a book about the development of windows NT. Same thing, a lot about people but not much about technical stuff.

reply

[–] zengid link

I think the main nugget is that they took Codds powerful mathematical system for defining and manipulating relations and created a simpler way to interface with it through the English keywords SELECT FROM WHERE.

I see a similar thing happening in Elm, as it tries to translate Haskell/ML ideas into simpler concepts without all of the category theory.

reply

[–] taf2 link

that's because SQL is perfect obviously /kids

reply

[–] dunkelheit link

Disappointingly low on technical detail... For me the most interesting part of an interview with the original author of some well-established technology is when he or she is discussing something that you take for granted and says something along the lines of "oh, that thing is more of a historical accident, I would design it a bit differently today". These nuggets can really broaden your perspective, but I couldn't find any of them in this interview.

reply

[–] cosmie link

Completely agree! Although most of the developers I interface with look at me like I'm an alien. So I don't know if SQL being the sanest part of my day is a point for SQL or a point against the general sanity of my day.

reply

[–] oneweekwonder link

what dialect of sql you find yourself in? I try to keep my env to pl/pgsql and like some pl/python on the side.

reply

[–] rhombocombus link

As someone who uses SQL extensively every day at my job, I really appreciate the thought that went into it's design. It is by far the most sane part of what I do every day.

reply

[–] petarb link

Took an undergrad comp sci class taught by Don Chamberlin at UCSC in 2009. He is a fascinating professor!

reply

[–] pramodhs link

Thank You. Yes, I'm a one-man army and would use some help. Finding interesting guests have not been hard but doing this week after week has been hectic, but I love it. Maybe someday I can run the podcast as a team.

reply

[–] Haul4ss link

Well considering you're doing it all by yourself, you are doing an awesome job! I look forward to each new interview. I like that you give the guests time to provide an in-depth answer without peppering them with too many questions.

When you're a famous podcaster you can do a Mapping the Journey episode about Mapping the Journey! :)

reply

[–] Haul4ss link

I've been subscribed to this podcast since his 2nd or 3rd episode. He's had some interesting guests.

I think the podcast is a one-man show. He could probably use some help with mixing/production (and a new intro theme), but for a one-man show it's pretty darn good.

Edit: I'm an idiot and just realized OP is the podcaster.

reply

[–] gumby link

I was glad for a transcript!

I find it interesting that the technology of the time meant it was hard to write ∀ and ∃ (though APL users seemed to go OK) and so they chose a complex syntax that reminds me of COBOL. The early database applications were business applications (SABRE being #1 I believe) so this wouldn't have been at all an unreasonable basis for SQL's syntax.

reply

[–] berbec link

Mr. Chamberlin was my dad's roommate at Harvey Mudd and worked with him at IBM. It amazes him how much Sequel runs the world now.

reply

[–] jason_slack link

One thing I thought about after reading this interview was just how much these grassroots projects (at the time) were done just as a labor of love. Also, just how free companies were with information. Publish a paper and share it with the world.

reply